Plant Available Sulfur in Biosolids

By Eliza Smith, Oregon State University

The Soil Fertility Specialist at Oregon State, Amber Moore, and research assistant Eliza Smith, in collaboration with Dan Sullivan, Nutrient Management Specialist at OSU, and Andy Bary, Soil Scientist at WSU, are working on a project entitled, “Plant-available S release from biosolids”.  The objective of the project is to investigate the amount and timing of plant-available sulfur release from biosolids produced by different technologies. 

Let Them Eat Cake

By Sally Brown, University of Washington

Abstracts of these resources are available in the searchable Information Portal offered to Northwest Biosolids members.

Regulations Corner - June 2019

Regulations Corner

Proposed Biosolids Project in Yelm

The proposed biosolids land application project in Yelm (WA) has a coordinated anti-biosolids community group. The land owner for the proposed project recently cancelled their involvement.

Among the community group's efforts, Preserve the Commons has: 

Leadership Spotlight Series

Most leaders in the biosolids arena took a circuitous path to get to where they are today. Not Andy Bary! While Andy was in graduate school studying agronomy, he worked as a research assistant at the Washington State University extension, and he found it challenging and rewarding. He says the job he has now is the only job he’s ever had in the biosolids field. Given the passion and expertise he brings to his work every day, it’s obvious he lucked out when he landed that first biosolids job.

King County Loop® Biosolids

What is the best way to communicate about biosolids? This is a question we all ask ourselves, all the time. It is a question we will have to keep asking ourselves. The landscape around us changes and so does the world of communications. 

City of Missoula

The City of Missoula collects and treats wastewater generated in the Missoula area. They produce about 2,000 dry metric tons of biosolids each year, which are sent via a conveyer belt to their neighboring compost facility, formerly EKO Compost. In 2012, the City of Missoula bought the land under EKO Compost for $1.5 million and in 2016, the City bought EKO Compost itself.